Outreach Educational Outreach The Institute recognizes that the new discipline of microbial forensics has diverse users that range from emergency management to public health to national security decision makers. While each of these individual groups has their own needs microbial forensics addresses, as a whole, the users have common needs. It is these common needs that can act as a starting point for educational outreach. Outreach that trains new practitioners, and facilitates data sharing. As these new practitioners grow they will contribute discipline improvements. Discipline improvements that will continue to improve the quality of the metrics and standards reliability. To achieve this expansion, the Institute and its partners develop learning modules that are first introduce the commonalities between users and then advance to each user’s unique needs through modules tailored for that group. Examples of these learning modules include dynamic crisis simulation, game design and, 'no fault' exercises designed to enhance forensics. Overall, the training program provides the means for experienced topical professionals to share their knowledge and demonstrate its relevance to real world requirements.
Outreach Educational Outreach The Institute recognizes that the new discipline of microbial forensics has diverse users that range from emergency management to public health to national security decision makers. While each of these individual groups has their own needs microbial forensics addresses, as a whole, the users have common needs. It is these common needs that can act as a starting point for educational outreach. Outreach that trains new practitioners, and facilitates data sharing. As these new practitioners grow they will contribute discipline improvements. Discipline improvements that will continue to improve the quality of the metrics and standards reliability. To achieve this expansion, the Institute and its partners develop learning modules that are first introduce the commonalities between users and then advance to each user’s unique needs through modules tailored for that group. Examples of these learning modules include dynamic crisis simulation, game design and, 'no fault' exercises designed to enhance forensics. Overall, the training program provides the means for experienced topical professionals to share their knowledge and demonstrate its relevance to real world requirements.
Outreach Educational Outreach The Institute recognizes that the new discipline of microbial forensics has diverse users that range from emergency management to public health to national security decision makers. While each of these individual groups has their own needs microbial forensics addresses, as a whole, the users have common needs. It is these common needs that can act as a starting point for educational outreach. Outreach that trains new practitioners, and facilitates data sharing. As these new practitioners grow they will contribute discipline improvements. Discipline improvements that will continue to improve the quality of the metrics and standards reliability. To achieve this expansion, the Institute and its partners develop learning modules that are first introduce the commonalities between users and then advance to each user’s unique needs through modules tailored for that group. Examples of these learning modules include dynamic crisis simulation, game design and, 'no fault' exercises designed to enhance forensics. Overall, the training program provides the means for experienced topical professionals to share their knowledge and demonstrate its relevance to real world requirements.
Outreach Educational Outreach The Institute recognizes that the new discipline of microbial forensics has diverse users that range from emergency management to public health to national security decision makers. While each of these individual groups has their own needs microbial forensics addresses, as a whole, the users have common needs. It is these common needs that can act as a starting point for educational outreach. Outreach that trains new practitioners, and facilitates data sharing. As these new practitioners grow they will contribute discipline improvements. Discipline improvements that will continue to improve the quality of the metrics and standards reliability. To achieve this expansion, the Institute and its partners develop learning modules that are first introduce the commonalities between users and then advance to each user’s unique needs through modules tailored for that group. Examples of these learning modules include dynamic crisis simulation, game design and, 'no fault' exercises designed to enhance forensics. Overall, the training program provides the means for experienced topical professionals to share their knowledge and demonstrate its relevance to real world requirements.